Community Expectations

Introduction

Communities expect agencies and government to act in a coordinated manner before, during and after fire events. To achieve this requires an understanding of how fire risk is incorporated in legislative frameworks and policy and planning processes across different sectors such as land use planning, infrastructure and transport - to help create safer communities.

This research is in three parts that aim 1) to understand and find a way for all relevant agencies to include fire and emergency management considerations in their decision-making processes, 2) to understand how urban and regional planning can better understand and reduce vulnerability to fire and 3) to examine ways to improve the sharing of responsibility and reconciling community expectations.

Project Leader

Prof Stephen Dovers
Stakeholder Council / Project Leader

Lead End User

Ayre
Stakeholder Council / Lead End User

Projects in this group

This project considered whether conflicting legal requirements, and fear of litigation, may impede decision making in emergency management. It identified the true impact of law upon fire management and community resilience. It also asked:
What are the objectives of emergency management policy? And what are,...

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The contribution of urban and regional planning to managing bushfire risk is increasingly significant, and integrating spatial planning and bushfire risk is a national policy priority.

This research has advanced the identification of leading practice in spatial planning for bushfire risk and emergency...

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In big picture terms, sharing responsibility for disaster management is about the ways governments and citizens work together to minimise the potential impact of disaster events. The 2009 Victoria Bushfires Royal Commission brought shared responsibility to the fore and the Council of Australian Governments made it...

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