Community Expectations

Introduction

Communities expect agencies and government to act in a coordinated manner before, during and after fire events. To achieve this requires an understanding of how fire risk is incorporated in legislative frameworks and policy and planning processes across different sectors such as land use planning, infrastructure and transport - to help create safer communities.

This research is in three parts that aim 1) to understand and find a way for all relevant agencies to include fire and emergency management considerations in their decision-making processes, 2) to understand how urban and regional planning can better understand and reduce vulnerability to fire and 3) to examine ways to improve the sharing of responsibility and reconciling community expectations.

Project Leader

Prof Stephen Dovers
Stakeholder Council / Project Leader

Lead End User

Ayre
Stakeholder Council / Lead End User

Projects in this group

Vulnerability to fires, and the ability to protect life, property and other assets, is largely defined by activities and policy settings in other policy sectors, defining fire and emergency management as a whole of government and cross-sectoral challenge. The community expects that different parts of government,...

Project Leader:
Lead End User:
Researcher:

A three-year research project to identify legal, urban and regional planning and policy and administrative structures and processes to enhance integration of the fire and emergency management imperative across policy sectors, agencies and portfolios (‘mainstreaming’).

The primary focus of the...

Linked Topics:
Project Leader:
Lead End User:

Bushfire risks and the responsibility for them are shared by overlapping dynamic (sometimes unintended) coalitions of stakeholders in the public, private and domestic sectors. Responsibility and ability to protect life, property and other assets, is largely defined by activities and policy settings in...

Project Leader:
Lead End User:
Researcher: