Effective communication - communities and bushfire

Effective communication is dependent upon the degree of social cohesion or fragmentation that characterises the community. This project looks at the interaction between communities and fire agencies - how do communities respond to communication messages. What is an effective message?

Aims

  • Increase community resilience to bushfires by developing a robust and analytic understanding of cohesion and fragmentation.
  • Shaping communication strategies, preparedness education, messages and delivery modes to increase bushfire preparedness.
  • The themes will be addressed in 12 case study sites across four states.

 

The outcome will be a suite of appropriate and tailored communication strategies that respond to community diversity in Australia, and enable local people to manage bushfire risk more effectively.

Related news

PhD students from around the world are enhancing fire research in Australia
Postgraduate students from around the world are bringing a diverse range of skills, experience and knowledge to enhance fire research through the Bushfire CRC.
Fire Note 104 presents examples of social networks
Fire Note 104 presents examples of social networks, aiming to understand the quality and characteristics of a social network that can aid bushfire preparedness.
Fire Note 102 explains the importance of a knowledge management system
Fire Note 102 explains the importance of a knowledge management system for the development of bushfire communication products. It shows the potential benefits of such a system for fire agencies, and outlines how the creation of a knowledge management system supports the Effective Communication: Communities and Bushfire project and broader bushfire research.
Fire Note 101 highlights gender matters in the Australian bushfire context
Fire Note 101 highlights the importance of gender matters in the Australian bushfire context and considers how the international literature on gender and disaster relates in the areas of risk perception and exposure, preparedness behaviour and communication, and response and recovery.
The panel sessions were a popular addition to the forum program
More than 75 researchers, end users, PhD students, land managers and industry representatives attended the seventh Bushfire CRC Research Advisory Forum on 23-24 October, held at the NSW Rural Fire Service headquarters in Sydney.
Bushfire CRC research went public in the western districts of Victoria.
Bushfire CRC research went public in the western districts of Victoria.

External References

John Schauble is the Lead End User for the Bushfire CRC project Effective Communication - Communities and Bushfire. He was interviewed at the 2010 Bushfire CRC annual conference.

See video

Resources linked to this Project

Presentation

Research Report

Poster